Thursday, November 20, 2014

Content strategy with slow content @mbloomstein #congrescm

I’m sharing some of my notes from the Content Marketing and Webediting conference I’m attending today. First up is Margot Bloomstein about content strategy using slow content for long-term change.
How to give people the right content in the right context?

Margot’s definition of content strategy is: planning of the creation, delivery, and governance of useful, usable, brand-appropriate content.

Margot’s talk is structured around the following ways to slow down your users with content:

1. Editorial style and structure
Points to tracking personal data. Lots of uptick around phone and apps to share and capture personal data (Fitbit and the like), but they don’t happen to good at long-term change. On the other hand 10Q is a good example of using content for long-term change.
Content affects experience… and the user’s perception it.
Frustrating activities feel slow, but if the activity make happy it does not feel slow.
2. Discover and comparison-style content type
Think the pathway through IKEA. Why do they do this? For instance to drive exploration.
And think about how Disneyland attractions create experience before, during and after you visit it. Content affects experience… and the user’s perception it.
Frustrating activities feel slow, but if the activity make happy it does not feel slow.
3. Long form content
Margot gives several examples from brands like Patagonia about how to use long and short content, fast and slow content.


Respect users when the pay attention to your brand. Be here now.

You can find Margot's slides here:




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